A Badger Book On Sunday With The Reverend R. L. Fanthorpe, Chapter 32

Rev Fanthorpe Frame

I’m a little later than usual with this week’s Badger book due to an outbreak of flu-like symptoms this past few days and so a sleep-in was the order of the day this morning. Now I’m up, showered, breakfasted and ready to settle down with my cuppa and this week’s title. I’ve chosen to read The Man From Beyond by John E. Muller who, as you’ll no doubt be aware before I even tell you is the writing trio of R. L. Fanthorpe, John S. Glasby and A. A. Glynn. Let’s have a look at that all important tagline first shall we;

Dare humanity accept the strange teachings of the man from beyond

Hmm… dare we indeed. A great, although sadly uncredited cover on this tome depicting yet another one of Badger’s beloved disembodied heads – this time the noggin in question is bald, green and appears highly perturbed by the bright red rocketship blasting off to his left. I love the range of emotions these heads seem to portray, from the slightly concerned to the seriously vexed – Badger has all bases covered.

Time to spend my lazy Sunday amongst the pages of this title now, tea and tissues to hand. I’ll be back at the same time next week with another selection from my Badger archive so please do join me and as ever, feel free to leave me a comment.

The Man From Beyond by John E. Muller
(Serial Number SF111)
This version was published in 1965 by Badger Books
The cover artist is uncredited

Badger - Muller, The Man From Beyond

Muller, The Man From Beyond (Back)

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4 thoughts on “A Badger Book On Sunday With The Reverend R. L. Fanthorpe, Chapter 32

  1. Bernie 28/06/2015 / 1:13 pm

    Another priceless posting! A little green man all grown up 🙂 Thanks as usual.

    Take care, Bernie xxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • unsubscriber 28/06/2015 / 1:14 pm

      Cheers Bernie, you’re more than welcome. This post was a little slow coming today but I’d like to think it was worth the wait. You take care too xxx

      Like

  2. lcmt 29/06/2015 / 11:47 pm

    “…and the natives were not renowned for their gregarious amiability” –That is as lovely an understatement in the passive voice as I have ever seen. I like how the inhabitants are both unknown and renowned. “A warmly human novel which sets out to examine the depths of bitterness” also navigates an impressively pretty sharp turn in rhetoric.

    Liked by 1 person

    • unsubscriber 01/07/2015 / 11:06 am

      It was actually a pretty good read, better than the usual Badger fare for a change.

      Like

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